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Day in the Life of a Financial Advisor

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Reading Time:  3  minutes

Has a day in the life of a financial advisor ever interested you?  Here’s a break-down of a typical day in my life. I’ve mentioned in this video how my activities center around 3 main themes: (1) marketing, (2) content creation, (3) client service. If you want to meet or exceed your revenue goals you have to concentrate on doing these activities on a consistent and ever-improving basis.


Wakeup 5-7am.

Why this big range? During the summer my wife (who works for the school district) so I tend to have later evenings and later morning wakeups to maximize time spent with her. Regardless of when I rise my day consist of:

  • 15-60 minutes of meditation, silence, reflection. In this time I may choose to pray, read (my bible or another book), journal or some activity that gives me focus and clarity;
  • 30 minutes to update my “GTD” system. I have a hybrid system of the “Getting Things Done” system (by David Allen).I discuss some of my best productivity hacks (including my system) in more detail in this video:

    Basically, all my previously “captured” ideas are placed into my task or projects list.   From there, I assign a due date and priority to that I can organize my time accordingly.  This is just a portion of this system but I advise anyone looking to be more productive with their time to have a “capture, process, and execute” type system to help them get things completed.

 

Between 8-9am.

I typically try not to have meetings before 9 am as it gives me enough of a buffer to complete everything I discussed previously.

I prepare slightly differently depending on the type of meeting I have but usually, I keep some type of notes in Dropbox Paper (if I’m sitting at my PC) and Evernote (if I only have my Ipad available).

Whether I meet with a coaching client or a wealth management client. I’ll reserve 15-30 minutes prior to the call to: (1)  review the notes of our last interaction and (2) create a rough agenda. This is just to be courteous of their time.

During this time I also check and sort email.  Rather than checking email throughout the day, I spend two large chunks of time–in the morning and at the end of the day.  I can more or less skim the subject line and figure out if will take me less than 15 minutes to do the task it requires and respond to the email. If not, I mark it and come back to it towards the end of the day. The reason is I just rather queue the email into my “capture, process and execute” system than lose precious minutes or hours of productivity.

Intense work (Part 1) between 9-12pm.

I go pretty hard in this block of time on tasks and projects.  Usually, go one-by-one so that I can fully concentrate on the task at hand. I learned this technique from a book I listened to called “The Practicing Mind: Developing Focus and Discipline in Your Life” (Sterner).   If you are constantly multi-tasking, but never getting traction, I highly recommend it.

Break for Food and a Walk 12-1pm.

Sometimes this will last longer, but I try to have a break in between morning and afternoon work.  Obviously, with the ability to work from home, this is easier to do.  It is admittedly harder in the summer with more folk in the house, so I have to be flexible.  Being able to recharge with a walk is a good thing for me.

day in the life of a financial advisor
day in the life of a financial advisor

Intense work (Part 2) between 1-4pm.

This is a repeat of the morning session. Again, this is usually in addition to meetings I might have with a client. Those are usually sprinkled throughout my day every day of the week, and every week of the year. (For a list of tasks, check out my calendar)

Shutdown 4-5pm.

I usually wind up my day with one last glance at email and my calendar.  I make sure to get any client requests that have hit my inbox scheduled to my calendar or onto my task or project list to be handled in the appropriate time frame.

 

If you are interested in a career as a financial advisor, here are 3 tips I recommend to set you apart.

 

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As an advocate for financial education, I love to share my knowledge in a “jargon-free” way to help you understand what it will take to win with your money!

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